Thursday, February 23, 2006

A Strange Request

Made a trip to Osage yesterday for a meeting, lunch, and then spent some time with Kelli. We always have a nice time together and I'm so thankful for this new friendship. When I was about to leave, I made what some would think to be a very strange request: "can I visit your chickens?" Kelli happily obliged and played "tour guide" around the farmyard pointing out the different breeds of chickens, cattle & hogs. I love the sweet smell of the barnyard and the soft cackle of the chickens made me feel at peace. I brought home a little sunshine with two dozen of the most beautiful eggs I have ever seen - - they are worth way more than you charge, Kelli!
It wasn't so long ago that this kind of barnyard was a common scene throughout America. We've really lost something very crucial to the balance of our lives. We don't understand where our food comes from. We don't have a relationship with the land. We don't really know our neighbors. We're losing small communities because we're losing farmers.

All is not lost, however. We can reclaim the economic health and quality of life in our rural communities by purchasing goods and services from local merchants, listening to our neighbors, and buying locally grown/raised food. Is this a strange request, too? I don't think so...we all win in the long run.

[Edited to add:] There must be something in the moon, because Between Plow and Wood had a similar post today...or is this what they call a "revolution."

[Edited to add:] On the way, I came upon a field with at least 100 wild turkeys - - beautiful sight!

2 comments:

Nancy Dancehall said...

Hi There,
I followed you back from Des Moines Girl's site.

"It wasn't so long ago that this kind of barnyard was a common scene throughout America. We've really lost something very crucial to the balance of our lives...etc."

I couldn't agree with you more. I grew up in Illinois, where bought our beef and pork directly from the farmer, and shopped our favorite roadside produce stands every summer. In the spring, we went to the strawberry farm to pick our own, and in the fall, we did the same at a local apple orchard. These are some of my happiest memories. It's such a travesty that this way of life is disappearing. The life most people live right now is totally unsustainable on a physica, psychological and spiritual level.

Sorry to leave such a long post, but this is one of my hot buttons! Good luck to you and your family. I hope you find your dream fulfilled on your three acres.

Gracious Acres said...

ND~
Thanks for your comments. I can tell that you're a "take no prisoners" kind a gal. We can all be part of the revolution and take back our food and sustainable lives, little by little by refusing to buy into the "Walmartization" of America. Keep up the good fight!